All these are reviews from Amazon and they are from real readers and customers, not family!

 

4.0 out of 5 stars

Historical Saga on the Prairies of Northwestern Canada, May 7, 2011

By  jac

This review is from: The Prairie Companions (Kindle Edition)

Pat and Clara seek that freedom of the new world that will allow them to live as they choose, together and with the ambition to succeed in an unforgiving landscape of bitter winds, rocky soil, and thick matted grasses barely suitable for sustainment. Despite hardships unnumbered, and with cunning and ingenuity, they start their farm. They do not know what awaits them in this frontier but they do know that, through strength and the virtue of their love, they will persevere. Along the way these two incredible women make friends who teach them invaluable lessons about building a life, about integrity, and about their own amazing qualities. Through the heartbreak of war, ravaging famine, and deep, personal loss, Pat and Clara’s bond grows in depth and richness; it holds them together when all else fails and brings a lightness to the dark Canadian winters.

This heartfelt historical saga is sure to open anyone’s eyes to love’s awe-inspiring possibilities. These characters are human; they bring the past to life. Through the words you will know the barrenness of the great Canadian grasslands, the joys of invention and innovation at the turn of the twentieth century, the realities of world wars and culture clashes. There is hope here, too. That ever-present hope for freedom—the freedom to find and build a better life, friendship, and love of every kind. A truly beautiful story.

5.0 out of 5 stars

not your average ‘frontier” story, April 3, 2013

By Al Rose

This review is from: The Prairie Companions (Kindle Edition)

Through the eyes of the protagonist, we journey through almost 60 years of personal journey, with the backdrop being the independent lifestyle of a girl who immigrated to Canada to escape ridicule for her choices. We follow her journey through farming for half a century in Canada through the late 1920s. Her cultural acclimation to Canadian Indian culture, her successful farming, and her choice of a partner always factor into the intrigue and storyline.

You will learn about Farming, and Canadian culture, and even a bit about mechanics and construction through this read.

author to be commended for the writing and sharing of this book.

5.0 out of 5 stars

Enjoyed this one, December 24, 2012

By Dian B

This review is from: The Prairie Companions (Kindle Edition)

Was a very interesting read. Enjoyed following the lives of these two women, and the story they had to tell. Gave me a different insight on things and that was good.

5.0 out of 5 stars

A character driven saga of love’s courageous endurance, August 6, 2012

By Marcia Quinn Noren

The Prairie Companions.

The story of Pat and Clara navigates across time and geography, from their girlhoods in Victorian England, to the great Canadian prairie that calls them to break ground on foreign soil. Defying convention, Pat’s ingenuity and pioneering spirit is in evidence long before she and Clara leave their families and rigid cultural restrictions behind.

Together, hand-in-hand, these two very different personalities fearlessly overcome each obstacle that threatens to block their determination to forge a new life. Mutual dependence gives way to inclusiveness, as indigenous locals become part of their ever-expanding, chosen extended family. Embracing tribal rituals, Pat and Clara learn entirely new ways of seeing themselves and connecting with the natural world that surrounds them.

David Rory O’Neill’s compelling characters and finely researched back-story demonstrate how the industrial revolution altered agriculture, how intimacy grows over time, and how the bonds of love allow us to survive the blows that inevitably fall into each life, no matter how well-lived.

5.0 out of 5 stars

By  kindleconvert

This review is from: The Prairie Companions (Kindle Edition)

What a compelling read this turned out to be, so descriptive that the reader is drawn into the story from page one. I enjoyed every aspect of this book and would thoroughly recommend it. It’s not just a love story where the two heroines fly in the face of convention and set out into the unknown, but also a testament to following your dream. I was caught up in their adventures and heartbreaks, and enjoyed the warmth of their extended family life. Can’t wait to read the stories of the next generations.

5.0 out of 5 stars

A wonderful and compelling book, 19 Jun 2011

By Cherie

This review is from: The Prairie Companions (Kindle Edition)

This books is an incredible journey into the lives of two young women who defy convention to follow their dreams. They refuse to be subject to prejudice or stereo-typical roles and as a result affect the lives of many people. They form friendships and create ties with people that are diverse and rich in character. The author demonstrates a great depth of knowledge and a great understanding of the diversity of people and our human frailties and paints these ‘truths’ through vivid pictures , with humour, love and passion. The story is a testament to the indomitable human spirit and cannot help but inspire all who read it. The adventure for these two pioneers begins in the early 1900’s and continues through the world changing events of two world wars. The gutsy journey of these two women entwined with a rich description of historical facts and places adds authenticity and makes for compelling reading.

5.0 out of 5 stars

Brilliant Read, 30 May 2011

By Pell

This review is from: The Prairie Companions (Kindle Edition)

My girlfriend persuaded me to get this book and I thought it would be much more for her than me. How wrong I was. Yes it’s a tender love story (we all need a bit of that these days) but it’s also about two really intrepid and pioneering women. The book is like a family saga with all the trials and tribulations, fun and sadness, fights and disasters that a family goes through. The difference is this family’ s lead by these two amazing women – Pat and Clara. The colourful and sympathetically drawn Cree Indian characters are a central part of the story and a wonderful bonus. The author has this ability to paint pictures with words really vividly. There are some powerful descriptions of people, places and historical world and local events. I really recommend this one; take it on Holiday.

Together, hand-in-hand, these two very different personalities fearlessly overcome each obstacle that threatens to block their determination to forge a new life. Mutual dependence gives way to inclusiveness, as indigenous locals become part of their ever-expanding, chosen extended family. Embracing tribal rituals, Pat and Clara learn entirely new ways of seeing themselves and connecting with the natural world that surrounds them.

David Rory O’Neill’s compelling characters and finely researched back-story demonstrate how the industrial revolution altered agriculture, how intimacy grows over time, and how the bonds of love allow us to survive the blows that inevitably fall into each life, no matter how well-lived.

Enthralling Saga, June 4, 2012

By Kev (Perth, Australia)

This review is from: The Prairie Companions (Kindle Edition)

This is a fantastic story that spans their entire lives. It had me laughing heaps and also reaching for the tissues. It’s a very well written and extremely well researched book.

I highly recommend this book.

5.0 out of 5 stars

Such a unique & engaging story…, August 24, 2012

By AngieB

This review is from: Conflict (The Daniel Series) (Kindle Edition)

LOVE this book which was so new and interesting to me having never read anything like it … it captured my attention immediately and I was desperate to learn more and more about the well-written characters of Daniel, Lauren & Bonny and how their story unfolds… I have since ripped through all the available books in the Daniel Series and anxiously await the next publication “Pyramid” (6th in the series). This series has intrigue, danger & excitement, feeling, love & sensuality … had my emotions all over the place!

3.0 out of 5 stars

4.0 out of 5 stars

Top title, 25 Sep 2011

By Chris

This review is from: Conflict (Kindle Edition)

One of the first books I have read on kindle and I wasn’t disappointed, I was kept interested in the book right throughout and the characters were brought to life with the detailed descriptions of each, I could almost imagine what Lauren looked like. I got really drawn in and had many late nights reading this while on holiday. Looking forward to picking up the next book in the Daniel series from this talented author.

5.0 out of 5 stars

Highly Recommended, 30 May 2011

By Pell

This review is from: Conflict (Kindle Edition)

I really enjoyed this read. The characters gripped me instantly. I was fascinated to know what happened to them in the story as they loved and battled their way through some hair-raising action. Real thrills and spills written at great pace. Each chapter brings a new intrigue. My girlfriend read it too and didn’t expect to enjoy this kind of thriller but there is plenty of romance in the book too and the 3 main characters end up in a kind of love triangle. An eye opening and surprising look at a subject I thought I’d not relate to. Alternative and a bit shocking but highly recommended. It sold me on this talented author and I’ve bought his next two books as well.

4.0 out of 5 stars

Wonderful Read, 4 July 2013

By Sami

This review is from: Conflict (Paperback)

In this first book in The Daniel Series, we meet Daniel and Lauren, meeting at a very young age and then finding each other again later on in life, these two are thrown into the exciting and dangerous life of espionage. Rising to the challenge that life presents them with, neither Daniel or Lauren falter in their games, until they meet Bonny. Becoming the attraction and love of their lives, Daniel and Lauren risk all to keep her out of harms way. Willing to face down any conflict that will interfere in their relationship.

This well written story by David Rory O’Neill is both intriguing and humorous, with lot’s of action thrown in. A good mix of love, passion, and risk taking.

Good Story, But Could Have Been Better, August 18, 2012

By Mother of 9 (Northeastern PA)

This review is from: Conflict (The Daniel Series) (Kindle Edition)

The basics of the story are good: a secret squad working against militants in Ireland. Unfortunately, the author dropped some character lines. For example, he dropped the story of Liam, one of the militants they helped escape his group, for most of the story, so by the time he was mentioned again, I’d almost forgotten who he was. And while I understood that there was sex in the book, in the middle of it, the sex overshadowed everything else. It’s too bad, because the characters were likable and believable, and the basics of the story were well done.

5.0 out of 5 stars

Should be a film!, 30 May 2011

This review is from: Challenge (Kindle Edition)

I was looking forward to this book after reading ‘Daniel’s Conflict’. A chance to follow the same characters was great. I’ve watched programmes on TV about the Falkland’s War but this story is brilliant because it takes a little known aspect of the war and turns it round so that the main heroes are the two women from the last book, Lauren and Bonny. They go to rescue Daniel and get themselves into really tricky situations, managing to talk, charm and fight their way out. O’Neill’s pace of writing really shows through; reading the book is like being on a roller coaster of action and emotions. It has a film like thing about it.

4.0 out of 5 stars

Thoroughly enjoyable, 4 July 2013

By Sami

This review is from: Challenge (Paperback)

In this second book in the Daniel Series, we find our three beloved characters, Daniel, Lauren, and Bonny, in a tight spot. Daniel has been seriously injured in an accident and is in an area that is both unreachable and hostile. Deciding to take action, his two love’s use their wits, style, and sexuality to save him, no matter the cost. Daring fate to challenge them, they risk all to save their love.

Another wonderfully written book by David Rory O’Neill. No one ever said the life of a spy was easy, but O’Neill’s writing style makes it both interesting and humorous, with just a dab of danger thrown into the mix.

5.0 out of 5 stars

Love this series!, August 20, 2012

By AngieBSee all my reviews

This review is from: Passion (The Daniel Series) (Kindle Edition)

I’m so caught up in this series of books right now! I’m half way though the 4th book “Grip” and am addicted to these characters … reading all night long and anxious to know what’s going to happen to Daniel and his family. I adore the Daniel and love to learn about other countries (Ireland, etc.) through the eyes of him, Lauren & Bonny. This is an interesting tale with intrigue, action, intense (and delicious) romance in the mix. Thanks for a fabulous story and I can’t wait to get through the next few books!

5.0 out of 5 stars

Satisfying conclusion to an incredible story, April 22, 2013

By AngieB

This review is from: Trial (The Daniel Series) (Kindle Edition)

With Trial being the last book in the Daniel Series, I was hesitant to start reading it because I knew the story would be ending and I’ve loved reading all the books in this saga and loved these characters. This book made me cry as each of the members of Dawes family lived through their own challenges and told their stories – it was heart-warming and heart-wrenching and I will miss Daniel, Lauren & Bonny (and all their children, friends, etc.) but I truly enjoyed this series and was satisfied with how things all came together in the end. Thank you, David, for sharing this tale.

5.0 out of 5 stars

Highly recommended!, March 26, 2012

By R. Lee Holz

This review is from: Surviving Beauty (The West Cork Trilogy) (Kindle Edition)

Surviving Beauty is a multilayered, complex mix of thriller and coming of age story that is pulled off beautifully. The thriller action is fast paced and credible. The coming of age story is more drawn out but thoroughly engaging. Author David Rory O’Neill handles sensitive issues with delicacy but doesn’t back away from the sensual and sexual where appropriate. I particularly like the way he plumbs the emotional and psychological depths of both heroes and villains. I look forward to reading the rest of the trilogy.

The Dangers that Walk With Beauty, March 7, 2012

This review is from: Surviving Beauty (The West Cork Trilogy) (Kindle Edition)

A simple question framed on the book’s cover, above the image of a sun-kissed blonde, her perfectly wide-set eyes brimming with innocence, hints at the controversial topics probed within David Rory O’Neill’s courageous and compelling novel: “Can Regan survive the exploitation of her beauty?” The title itself suggests what many of us know full well, yet fail to consciously acknowledge. An element of danger accompanies the attribute of beauty.

This first volume of the “West Cork Trilogy” takes readers into young Regan’s world, where shadows stalk her every move throughout the precious days, months and years of her late childhood and early adolescence. Well paced chapters introduce a growing cast of finely developed characters, bringing intensity, suspense, confrontation, rescue and retribution.

The heroic force embodied by Detective Inspector Jim Burrows breaks the grip of evil that has held Regan and her friend Mary in a state of bondage. But wounded creatures suffer from their unseen scars, long after the trap has been sprung. While the coping mechanisms that served to support Regan’s survival are no longer needed, they remain fixed at the core of her being.

Jim’s strong convictions find support in the genuine, tender love he shares with his sensuous Biddy, the wife who stands beside him. Their relationship demonstrates the healing power of romantic harmony, allowing Regan to find the security, safety and serenity that had been absent from her life. Will the gifts so generously offered by Jim and Biddy provide adequate soothing balm to heal and transform Regan’s inner turmoil and confusion into calm self-containment? I look forward to finding the answer to this and much more in “Beauty’s Price” and “Blue Sky Orphan” as the trilogy continues.

By Marcia Quinn Noren

This review is from: Beauty’s Price (The West Cork Trilogy 2) (Kindle Edition)

In “Beauty’s Price”, the second book of David Rory O’Neill’s “West Cork Trilogy” we are reunited with the characters introduced in “Surviving Beauty”. O’Neill’s themes combine incidents of high drama, action-packed enough to be in the “thriller” category, with soothing, authentic interaction between his extraordinarily strong characters. The lives they lead might be considered exotic, and far from conventional. Embracing their worldview requires the reader’s willingness to move away from the ordinary.

I am inspired by the bravery displayed by these characters as they move through their individual and collective emotional and physical crises, facing down whatever confronts them. What is most beautiful about their inter-relationships is that no one is alone here; they guard and protect one another, in scenes that combine acts of ferocity with moments of great tenderness. David and Regan are physically beautiful lovers whose happy ending seems certain, and yet we know that life offers anything but certainty. The evil acts and influences inflicted upon them by Eric Lang and Jo Dillon in “Surviving Beauty” left them both scarred on the inside. Those interior wounds now take their toll, years later.

As we have seen in the world of celebrity, when a woman is blessed with perfect beauty, the asset seen by the world as powerful, she will not necessarily be fortunate. She will not be treated with greater respect, but instead she will experience objectification. Looking into a mirror, she may only see her flaws.

She only knows that she is noticed, no matter where she goes, even into the supermarket. She feels the responses coming at her, and they are not all positive. Being `ogled’ can feel more threatening than complimentary. She may be more likely to attract the `wrong kind’ of man, the kind of man who wants to possess something of value. She eventually may discover that her beloved was smitten by his own idealization of her, and is terrified of facing the reality of her flaws and complexities.

Jim Burrows provides the final, heroic act of retribution that frees Regan and Mary from being forever imprisoned by the past. But David’s release is less clear. Will he survive beauty’s price? More will be revealed in “Blue Sky Orphan” as his shadow haunts the third book in the West Cork Trilogy. We must believe in his survival, as these characters continue to prove that the power of love stands victorious over adversity and evil.

5.0 out of 5 stars

Soaring Through Challenges, November 4, 2012

By  Marcia Quinn Noren

This review is from: Blue Sky Orphan.: The West Cork Trilogy (Paperback)

After reading and reviewing the first two books in The West Cork Trilogy, I was grateful to receive a copy of this paperback, the final volume in this trilogy from the author, as a gift. Major themes in the novels of David Rory O’Neill are human sensitivity, the power of open-hearted empathy, and triumph over adversity, brought by physical and emotional strength. In “Blue Sky Orphan” we are introduced to Emma, the character I grew to love most, in all the books of his West Cork Trilogy.

In the opening pages we find Emma the pilot, alone in the blue sky, bursting with the joy that comes from feeling such freedom, yet risk-taking, once again. For her, this is an all-too familiar game; cheating death, one more time. Taking risks has become more than second nature for Emma, it is part of her essence. She doesn’t know how to live any other way.

Instinct-injured women are drawn toward forms of danger that would repel those with “normal” instincts. Emma’s self-containment is unnerving for those who observe her closely. She considers herself the observer, and is almost unaware of being observed. Accustomed to attracting the attention of both genders, she remains internally preoccupied with her thoughts, duties and plans of action. Those who watch her ask themselves, “What is it that holds her together and yet apart, so very separate from the rest of us?”

All of that changes when Emma steps out of the comfort zone of her compatible partnership with the enigmatic Peter, into the world of his past, and the people and places he had kept secret from her. Becoming introduced to Lauren and Daniel, two primary characters who populated that world, would open her, change and break her, then make her whole again. Bonny, who completes the inexplicable triad is an enchantress whose spell-casting mesmerizes and captivates Emma. The mutual attraction between these powerful women is perfectly natural, but their acceptance of one another’s power is utterly unlike what most of us have experienced. That power brings healing beyond measure to each of these individual women, and to the men who love them.

There are surprising, explosive confrontations within the pages of this book, as villainous pirates attack during a pleasure cruise, and Emma witnesses the kind of unholy violence that was part of Peter’s history with Daniel and Lauren. Ultimately, safety comes from the sanctity of the bond that holds these characters together. What held true for me as I read “Blue Sky Orphan” is the ebb and flow that takes place in each human heart, that constant movement taking us in and out of connection to the hearts of others.